Skip to main content

About your Search

20131205
20131205
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
a property here. >> what has been the relationship of his image to the a.n.c., the african national congress. >> as before, he is definitely the biggest name, the biggest figure to come out of the a.n.c. he was the one who in the 40's formed the a.n.c. youth league. he then radicalized the a.n.c. and convinced the a.n.c. to pursue a program of sabotage against the apartheid government. he has always been the person everyone looks to. in his later years, he has faded. he has not had the presence to lead the organization anymore, but he has always been the point of reference. he has always been the one anyone would refer to if they the moral high ground, or if they wanted to talk about the direction of the country. >> now, is there a divide we need to understand when we think about south africa that still exists economically as well as educationally and socially? >> there has been a huge divide in south africa. south africa remains a very unequal society. white south africans on average earn six times more than the average black south africans. there is a huge racial component to all of this.
of the anc, he goes to prison, and there is this transition. can you talk to us about nelson mandela during those prison years and that transformation. the think sing that he is both an inspirational and elegant sportsman. he is also a very practical politician. he has argued a peaceful change when that was possible, he considered that armed struggle might be necessary. he only opted the struggle in the early 1960's, and it was at that point that the south african government has banned the congress, if you were black, you could not vote, not even speak politically. even when he was released from prison in the 1990's, he did say, or he would not renounce the necessity in certain circumstances for using armed struggle. remember the south african military was threaten to have a coupe, and there was a good chance in 1994, instead of having an elected black majority, we may have seen a white racism military regime. it came very very close. >> professor, hang on, i can see ali velshi nodding here. >> yeah. professor remember in the negotiations leading to the first election, the white supremacist
. unemployment, and poverty continue to be real issues for the country, this many years now, with the anc, at the head of the political weather. >> you know, it is a combination of things. i think worldwide jobs, and labor, have -- it's a very difficult period worldwide for those but in south africa it is a place of great deal idealism, that's been cheated of it's democratic birthright in many ways. by corruption, by nepotism, and by lack of concern for those small people that have been called that nelson la used to understand were the bedrock of what makes a nation. >> well, and it is good to talk to you, greg. at this moment in time, i thank you for your insights and your thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela, and these are pictures from johan news burg outside the house. nelson mandela, the u.n. secretary general, was he making a statement of the passing, just let me know. let me bring in my colleague morgan ratford. lived and talks -- i did not know this, in south africa. morgan, what are your thoughts in. >> there was in 2010, i was there as a full right and i taught at the unive
declerk to reform the government had to play peace keeper, trying to temper escalading violence anc, and supporters of the freedom barty, who wanted no part of negotiations with the government that had helped him down for so long. thousands were killed in black on black fighting. also, his marriage to winny mandela, a powerful political force herself was crumbling, the woman who supported him so publicly during the long years of incarceration was accused of having affaired and being linked to some of the violence in south africa. they finally deviced. through it all, he led the country through broader democracy, and in 1984, he was able to vote for himself in a free election. he won, and was inaugurated as the first black president of his country. >> on this day, you took destiny into your own hands. you decided that would nothing would stop you from electing the government of your choice. country's infrastructure. he met the white house, meeting with three sitting presidents. in 2002 george w. bush presented him with the medal of freedom. president obama met mandela once in 2005, w
and a leading voice in the african national congress, the anc. struggling to end the inequality of apartheid, white ruled south africa's policy of racial segregation. but in 1960 after police shot and killed 49 protestors, the anc which had always been nonviolent created a military wing under mandela's command. >> there are many people who feel that it's useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against the government. >> reporter: the regime determined to maintain white rule saw the inspiring young revolutionary as a threat. >> our struggle is truly national. it is a struggle for the right to live. >> reporter: mandela was imprisoned in 1962 and two years later sentenced to life in prison, accused of working to overthrow the government. in court, on trial for his life he said this. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live and to see realized, but my lord, if it needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: four miles off the coast of cape town south africa on robben island, he sp
of the nation, aimed at civil installations and not soft or human targets but in times can, the anc their acts bore no comparison to the thousands murdered in otherwise disappeared by the regime. >> there are many people whofeed futile for us to continue talkintalking peace and nonviole against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. well i'm on the defenseless people. >> in 1962 a vishz crack downwas caught up in the regime's wide net. his anc colleagues were rounded up and jailed. in 1963 during what came to be called the ravonia trial, the government tried and convicted mandela and seven of the top command of the anc on charges of sabotage and fomenting revolution. a capital offense. the eight were sentenced to life in prison. even from his cell on robin island, the alcatraz like island, six miles from cape town, mandela was uncompromising, says helen, a parliament service person. >> mattresses, the fact that thr between, and mostly about the behavior of the war den who has a tattoo on the back of his hands of the swastika. he says this man is very bad, he treats us badly. >> but e
to europe and other countries in africa to built support for the anc and study guerilla warfare. when he returned to south africa in 1962, mandela was arrested and sentenced to years in prison. during his sentence, the government charmed mandela and other anc leaders with sabotage and attempting to violently overthrow the government. the winner of 1964, mandela and his colleagues were sentenced to in prison. mandela's brutal imprisonment helped win freedom for his nation. he represented himself and in his defense spoke out about democracy. equality and freedom. on february 2nd, 1990 amidst escalating international pressure, south african president lifted the ban on the anc and released mandela. mandela was awarded the nobel peace prize in december of 1993. in april of 1994, in south africa's first truly democratic election where all races were allowed to participate, nelson mandela was overwhelming elected to the presidency. he was battling a respiratory infection since early june. a remarkable man and a remarkable life and a model of stick-to-itiveness and never give up. a man of tremen
applaud and defer to him was awesome. because in many ways the anc learned from the civil rights movement here, but the giants of the movement here really, really exalted what nelson mandela had done and what he represented. because he became, he personified the very change that he had come to represent universally. and it was reminiscent of the stories i heard from mrs. coretta scott king often about her husband, he late martin luther king. and joining me by phone, the former u.s. ambassador to the united nations and the former executive director of dr. king's sclc. thank you very being with us tonight. >> thank you very much and god bless you. and this is really, you know, for african folk and people of african descent, the going home is a celebration, it's not a sad time. and if there's anybody that can go home with a victory, it's nelson mandela. he was able to lead his people to triumph and hate. forgiveness in place of vengeance. and south africa is a democratic free market economy right now that's still struggling, but there's a spirit about that place that always gets you going. i
ans of ance for. >> great thank you let's begin by asking the applicant to come forward. i don't know if it's justin beem and daniel brooker for resolute drinks or daniel book er that are coming in but if you could just come up to the podium and briefly introduce yourself and if you can mention in your presentation the kind of outreach you have done to the community and to the district supervisor. >> good morning this is marcia garland and i'm here with dan book er and justin about beam 678 geary will replace a vacancy one that's been vacant for a year and one for 3 years. they began their out research and contracted first off for fifty apartments. they then sent 700 letters to people in the immediate area and followed that up later formally to 38 hundred residents within a 500 foot radius and canvassed the immediate business community several blocks wide and got 22 letters of support. they presented to the alliance to glide memorial church and to the community leadership alliance and got support from everybody and in addition they have subsequent engagements and arrived at a comp
called at that time the anc terrorists and when he came out of prison, when he said i say to you all, take your guns, your knives, your pangers and throw them into the sea, fully declaring in his first -- practically his first public address after 28 years of being in the wilderness in prison, no, this has to be peaceful. this was huge and then you know, you heard president zuma say this is the father, the founding father of our democratic south africa, and you heard robyn talk about the tribal homeland where he lived and the rural area where he's going to be finally laid to rest, and i think i will never forget the pictures not just of the snaking lines of hundreds of thousands of millions of people in the towns and the cities who cast their ballots for nelson mandela in 1994, but the helicopter shots of the countryside, when people were literally lining up in zigzag lines so quietly, so peacefully, so joyfully, just to have the privilege of casting their first ever vote in 1994, this majority black country, they had never had that right before and they stepped up to the plate. ther
the first legal anc rally in national rally at the soccer stadium you've been talking about the last place mandela appeared during the world cup in 2010. that soccer city was new at the time when i was down in 1989. in that october, that was the first time the anc was allowed to gather in the legal fashion. it was considered a terrorist group at the time. i remember how the crowd hushed for the first time. they raised their hands in the air and sang the national anthem. it means god bless africa, had been illegal up until that point in october 1989. at that point you knew things were changing rapidly and the clerk had started something he wasn't going to be able to stop. a par tide was ending. nelson man dell laugh was to be released from prison. he was held on robin island five miles off the coast and like alcatraz like many years. he talked where he wrote his long walk to freedom, auto biography. they spent grueling hours in the sun breaking rocks on the island looking in the distance at the mountain in cape town and the beautiful cape town in the distance. mandela became close to his pr
a year to be members of the anc's customer loyalty program. they get at $10 discount after every $100 ticket purchases but now anc promises, quote, a chance to own a piece of the action at the same price as wall street investors, taking $2,500 of new stocks with no fees, the same terms to amc employees, hoping to raise $400 million in total, riegle is the nation's largest theater chain up 20% in the past 12 months but the customer loyalty program and to spin, studies show canceled on to a stock longer than regular investors. rather than sell and bailout true fans can buy more of it after a dip. tracy: my mom has one of those. dennis: this will be an interesting plan for moviegoers to buy stock they never would have heard about. ashley: this might follow suit. dennis: will free might be on that. ashley: as marijuana is legalized in some states one man is hoping to smoke industry competition in an attempt to establish what he calls the anheuser-busch of marijuana. justin hard field is investing in everything from retail stores, emerald green capital, sees a lot of green on the marijuana
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12